Virtual Child Assignment and Paper
During the course of the quarter you will be raising a virtual child. For this assignment, you will be focusing on birth through age 12. Although the virtual child can be raised through age 18, for this class, you can stop at age 12. Please note that you do not have this option with real children. While it is possible to raise your child from birth to age 12 in one sitting, it is not recommended. Even virtual children take several hours to raise (Yes, I tried it). Therefore, I have suggested dates for completing portions of the assignment throughout the quarter.

This assignment is designed to assess learning goals 1 “Articulate how the child and the child’s contextual experience combine to influence development,” 4 “Develop oral and written communication skills,” and 5 “Apply course information to your life.”

The process of raising your child goes as follows:

1. Log in at the www.myvirtualchild.com website and access your virtual child
2. Enter the required information. Please use your real name so that I can give you credit for completing this assignment.
3. Where it says “Enter Your Class ID”, type: 24236
4. Enter information that determines your child’s characteristics and personality.
5. Start raising your child by answering multiple choice questions.
6. The system will provide you with information about how your child is progressing. You can adjust your future parenting accordingly. However, just as in real life, you can’t go back and change your answers. So, choose wisely and honestly.
7. At certain points, the system will ask you to answer questions. These are for your own reflection purposes only. I will not be reading them. However, in order to move forward, you have to answer them with at least a sentence or two. The more thoughtful and reflective you are during this process, the more it will help you to write the paper component of this assignment.
8. When you get past age 12, you can stop, but you can keep going if you wish.
9. Keep in mind that I will not be grading you on the degree to which you have raised a “good kid.” Instead, you will be given 10 points for completing the task of raising your child past age 12.
10. Finally, you will write a brief (about 4 pages) reflection paper that links your childrearing choices to your child’s outcomes and the themes discussed in class. A checklist and grading rubric for this portion of the assignment are below.

Example of Connections Between Scholarly Literature and Virtual Parenting Experience
Overall, my Virtual Child was an “easy child” meaning that he “established regular routines in infancy, is cheerful, and adapts easily to new experiences,” (Berk & Meyers, 2016, Structure of Temperament). This was especially evident when getting his shots. He was upset by the shot but calmed down quickly and was happy and smiling at the other people at the doctor’s office (MyVirtualChild). Facilitating a good fit was fairly easy as my Virtual Child had an easy temperament. For example,…

Virtual Child Assignment Checklist
o Introductory Paragraph
o Provide an overview of your paper. Briefly summarize your child’s initial characteristics, parenting adjustments you made as you raised your child, and your child’s developmental achievements.

o Part 1: Initial ideas about parenting
o Describe your initial ideas about parenting. What were your initial views on parenting?
o Link your initial parenting ideas to class. Briefly describe one of the developmental theories that we discussed in class (remember to cite the text or a scholarly article) that you feel aligns with your initial ideas about parenting.
o Make clear connections between your initial views on parenting and the theory; remember to cite the text or a scholarly article appropriately.

o Part 2: Temperament characteristics of your child
o Describe your virtual child’s temperament (see pages 253-260 of your text)
o Reflect upon your child’s temperament. Were there any aspects of his/her temperament that were particularly challenging? How did you facilitate a “good fit” between your child’s temperament and their environment?
o Refer to the text or a scholarly article when describing and reflecting upon your child’s temperament.

o Part 3: A challenge
o Describe a particular challenge that you faced as you were raising your child. What was the challenge and how did you respond? (e.g. learning issues, divorce, sibling challenges)
o Reflect upon the challenge. Did your initial ideas about parenting change as you confronted this challenge? If so, how? If not, why not?
o Be sure to cite the text or a scholarly article when supporting the choices you made.

o Part 4: Age 12
o Describe your child’s developmental achievements and challenges at age 12.
o Reflect on the outcome of raising your virtual child. In your opinion, what is a “good outcome” for 12-year-old children? In what ways did your child meet your expectations of a “good outcome”? In what ways did they not meet these expectations?
o If you could do one thing differently in raising your virtual child, what would it be and why? If you don’t want to change anything, explain why not.
o Be sure to cite the textbook or a scholarly article to support your argument.

o Conclusion
o Summarize your paper. Overall, how do you feel about your virtual child’s development and your virtual parenting experience?

Grading Rubric for the Virtual Child Assignment

Completion of Raising Child to age 12:
10 points = You raised your child past age 12
5 points = You raised your child to age 6
2 points = You created a child
0 points = You did not create a child

Introduction:
4 = Introduction clearly outlines the main parts of the paper.
2 = There is a vague attempt at an introduction, but it is confusing.
0 = No introductory paragraph

Part 1, Initial parenting ideas: Description and reflection
5 = Description and reflection clearly and fully address the checklist questions pertaining to your initial ideas about parenting.
3 = Description and reflection incompletely, vaguely, or unclearly address the checklist questions pertaining to your initial ideas about parenting.
0 = Description and reflection about your initial ideas about parenting are not present.

Part 1, Initial parenting ideas: Connections to the text or scholarly article
5 = Connection to text or a scholarly article is clear and an accurate representation of the ideas presented. Page numbers are provided in the reference.
3 = Connection is vague, tenuous, or inaccurate.
0 = There are no connections to the text or a scholarly article.

Part 2, Temperament characteristics: Description and reflection
5 = Description and reflection clearly and fully address the checklist questions pertaining to the child’s initial characteristics and temperament.
3 = Description and reflection incompletely, vaguely, or unclearly address the checklist questions pertaining to the child’s initial characteristics and temperament.
0 = Description and reflection about child’s initial characteristics and temperament are not present.

Part 2, Temperament characteristics: Connections to the text or scholarly article
5 = Connection to text or scholarly article is clear and an accurate representation of the ideas presented. Page numbers are provided in the reference.
3 = Connection is vague, tenuous, or inaccurate.
0 = There is no connection to the text or a scholarly article.

Part 3, A challenge: Description and reflection
5 = Description and reflection clearly and fully address the checklist questions pertaining to one of your parenting challenges.
3 = Description and reflection incompletely, vaguely, or unclearly address the checklist questions pertaining to one of your parenting challenges.
0 = Description and reflection about one of your parenting challenges is not present.

Part 3, A challenge: Connections to the text or a scholarly article
5 = Connection to text or scholarly article is clear and an accurate representation of the ideas presented. Page numbers are provided in the reference.
3 = Connection is vague, tenuous, or inaccurate.
0 = There is no connection to the text or a scholarly article.

Part 4, Age 12: Descriptions and reflection
5 = Description and reflection clearly and fully address the checklist questions pertaining to your virtual child at age 12.
3 = Description and reflection incompletely, vaguely, or unclearly address the checklist questions pertaining to your virtual child at age 12.
0 = Description and reflection about your child at age 12 is not present.

Part 4, Age 12: Connections to the text
5 = Connection to text or scholarly article is clear and an accurate representation of the ideas presented. Page numbers are provided in the reference.
3 = Connection is vague, tenuous, or inaccurate.
0 = There is no connection to the text or a scholarly article.

Conclusion:
2 = Conclusion clearly summarizes your thoughts regarding your virtual child’s development and your virtual parenting experience.
1 = There is a vague attempt to conclude the paper, but it is confusing.
0 = No conclusion paragraph

References:
2 = In-text references are provided for all sources and generally conform to APA style. Full references for scholarly articles are provided at the end of your paper and generally conform to APA style. You could even cut and paste the reference for the textbook from the syllabus into the references section of your paper!
1 = References are incomplete, but an attempt was made to cite sources.
0 = No attempt was made to cite sources.

Proofreading
2 = Good effort at proof-reading your paper.
0 = Spell-check was not used. Furthermore, the grammar is so problematic that it is difficult to understand what you are trying to say.

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*Information that the writers may need about my virtual child assignment* *My kid’s name is called Jungkook*

– 9-Month Pediatrician’s Report –
As Jungkook turns 9 months, the pediatrician has the following to say after a routine physical exam, a few items administered from the Bayley Scales of Infant Intelligence, and some observations of Jungkook in the playroom:
When Jungkook becomes upset, it is difficult to soothe him down. He sometimes accepts your embraces and sometimes pushes you away.
Based on your report, Jungkook is able to digest new foods well, so the doctor recommends that Jungkook eat a variety of foods from the family dinner (ground up).
Jungkook is cautious and shy in most new situations or with new people. With you present, he will eventually explore, but rarely warms up completely to the strange situation or person.
Jungkook has typical emotional reactions for his age, such as fear of total strangers, separation anxiety and a quick, loud cry when upset or in pain.
Jungkook is advanced in his gross and fine motor skills and enjoys crawling, pulling up to stand and manipulating objects.

– Infant/Toddler Temperament (12 months) –
Virtual Child uses five dimensions of temperament to describe the child’s behavior in the first 30 months. These dimensions are influenced by your questionnaire responses, and change gradually over time in response to events and parenting decisions. They include four dimensions that overlap with the Big Five personality traits, Sociability (extraversion/introversion), Emotionality (neuroticism), Aggressiveness vs. cooperativeness (agreeableness), and Self-control (conscientiousness), and a fifth dimension, Activity level. Twin, adoption and longitudinal studies indicate there are genetic and environmental influences on the five types of traits in the program.
ACTIVITY refers to the physical and mental energy level of the child. Highly active children may sleep less, be more restless, and engage in more physical activity. Less active children may sleep more, enjoy quiet pastimes, and show less interest in vigorous physical activity.
SOCIABILITY refers to the child’s friendliness and desire for social interaction (ranging from low to high)
EMOTIONALITY refers to the intensity of emotion experienced by the child. Highly emotional children may show more of everything (anger, joy, sadness) and more fluctuation in moods. Less emotional children may show less extreme emotions and less fluctuation over periods of time.
AGGRESSIVENESS VS. COOPERATIVENESS refers to the tendency of the child to be aggressive in social situations with the parent, day-care provider or other children. Highly aggressive children may be quite resistant to parental demands and throw tantrums or even lash out at the parent or other children. Less aggressive children tend to be more cooperative, or to whine and fuss rather than actively resist the parent. Research indicates that boys are somewhat more aggressive than girls, but there is a great deal of overlap between the sexes, and this is reflected in Virtual Child.
SELF-CONTROL refers to the child’s ability to control his or her behavior, delay gratification, plan out a course of action, or inhibit responses to a typical situations. This is not exactly the same thing as aggressiveness or emotionality. For example, a child with low self control might take a cookie when asked to wait, not out of a spirit of lack of cooperation, but just due to low impulse control. Children who are extreme on this dimension may fit typical criteria for attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. The Virtual Child has a 5% chance of having moderate to severe ADHD and a 5% chance of having mild ADHD.
GOODNESS OF FIT is a concept that is closely related to temperament. It refers to the tendency of the parent to adapt his/her behavior to the child’s temperament. For example, suppose you have a very active child, and you are trying to promote exploration and learning. Rather than “going against the grain” and attempting to quiet the child down to look at a book about bugs, you might appeal to the child’s active nature and choose to go on a walk and talk about the bugs you see. Goodness of fit also applies to developmental level. For example, at 6-8 months most infants are at least somewhat anxious around strangers, so you would want to introduce the child to a new person gradually rather than thrusting the child into the person’s arms. Parents desiring to change their child’s temperament, or help their child develop a particular skill, can benefit from the principle of goodness of fit, and the related concept of moderate novelty. Parents desiring to encourage growth in their child should introduce moderately novel activities and experiences, because children are more likely to pay attention to and profit from such experiences.

– 19-month Developmental Testing –
The preschool that you are considering for Jungkook offers low-priced developmental assessments. Jungkook is able to enroll when he becomes reasonably well potty-trained. He is 19 months old now. Just to find out how Jungkook’s development compares to other children of his age at this point, you have an assessment done. The early childhood specialist observes Jungkook in free play with other kids and does a little testing of cognitive skills. She reports the following:
After he got warmed up, Jungkook seemed to get along very well with the other kids, and was unusually cooperative for a child of his age. The examiner thought that Jungkook would adapt well to the preschool environment.
The specialist thought that Jungkook was securely attached, but that the communication system between parent and child could be improved. She recommended that both parents try to read Jungkook’s reactions more carefully and work on interpersonal communication.
Jungkook was shy with the examiner, who thought he was nervous around new adults or just didn’t know what to do. She recommended that Jungkook stay with one primary preschool or daycare provider during the day and get to know other new adults slowly.
Jungkook was generally in a positive mood during the play sessions, but occasionally could be irritable or impatient when things did not go his way.
Jungkook scored at about the 18-19 month range for communication skill, language comprehension and language production. This is age-appropriate of course, but the examiner recommended that because Jungkook was in such an important period of language development, that you spend as much time as possible talking with Jungkook, asking questions that require some kind of extended answer (rather than just “yes” or “no”), and looking at and naming things in picture books, etc.
Jungkook was age-appropriate on tasks such as building a block tower to model one made by the examiner and other spatial skills such as copying shapes, coloring within the lines and solving picture puzzles.
Jungkook was advanced in his gross motor skills. The examiner recommended that you expose Jungkook to a variety of indoor and outdoor activities and let his interests be the guide as to what to pursue.
The examiner commented that Jungkook was able to concentrate very well during all of the informal testing, and if this continues, he would be more than ready for preschool-type activities, which typically require children to stay on task or remain in “group time” for 10-15 minutes. She also recommended getting Jungkook to follow simple directions at home, gradually increasing the complexity and length of the directions.

– Age 2 1/2 Developmental Testing –
Jungkook is going to be starting a preschool program soon, so you take advantage of the fact that a friend of yours is an early childhood development specialist. You ask her to evaluate Jungkook, who is 2 1/2 years old. The specialist evaluates Jungkook’s language, motor and cognitive skills using some developmental scales, and observes Jungkook interacting with other children in a toddler play group. This is her report:
Jungkook was somewhat hesitant in the group of children and spent a few minutes watching them before joining in. After a while he latched on to a couple of the other children and had a good time. By the end of the session they were smiling and imitating each other.
Jungkook was generally not very aggressive with the other kids, but would sometimes say “Mine!” if there was a toy both children wanted. However, Jungkook would usually smile and give up the toy a few moments later and seek out a different toy. The specialist said that Jungkook was ready for preschool already in terms of aggressive behavior.
Jungkook handled challenging tasks fairly well except for an occasional need for encouragement.
Jungkook’s scores on measures of language comprehension and production were in the average range, and he was beginning to show more consistent use in conversational speech of grammatical markers such as past tense, plural, etc. The specialist recommended you continue to converse about anything of interest to Jungkook, read favorite books to him and go on outings.
Jungkook is about average in solving problems with more than two steps, and grouping objects together in categories. The specialist recommended that you help Jungkook “talk through” the steps in solving problems, and that you expose Jungkook to more hands-on learning activities (e.g., at the children’s science museum).
He is in the average range in copying shapes with a pencil, working with picture puzzles and constructing things out of blocks. The specialist recommended offering Jungkook a range of these activities to choose from and to go with the ones that seemed of most interest to him.
Jungkook was above average on nearly all gross motor skills, such as climbing, throwing and catching a ball, balancing, and skipping and enjoyed these activities quite a bit. The advice was to continue these activities, emphasizing Jungkook’s interests and focusing on having fun with them.
Jungkook was able to focus on the tasks given by the examiner for the entire 40-minute session. The examiner said this was unusually good for the age. She recommended that you ask Jungkook to carry out more and more complex daily tasks (such as getting dressed) and read longer stories in preparation for preschool.

– Personality Types –
There is evidence that there are three main personality types in childhood and the Virtual Child’s behavior beginning at age 3 and 4 is designed to resemble one of these personality types. The personality types combine some of the temperamental traits with which you are already familiar. The overcontrolled category refers to a child who is cooperative, and follows the rules, but is shy in social situations and anxious and clingy under pressure. The undercontrolled category refers to a child who is uncooperative or even aggressive, does not follow the rules, is not particularly shy in social situations, and has a tendency to become distracted and overly emotional, particularly when under stress. The resilient category refers to a child who is cooperative and follows the rules, is friendly, non-aggressive and outgoing, is able to focus on tasks without being too distracted, has good regulation of his or her emotions, and is adaptable to new situations.

– Age 3 Developmental Testing –
Jungkook has been in preschool for a while and you are curious about his progress. So you hire your friend the early development specialist to do a formal assessment and observation at the preschool during the summer.
Based on the testing situation and the observations at the preschool, your friend thought that Jungkook was outgoing and not at all hesitant to get involved in activities at preschool. However, she noted that Jungkook was having some difficulties complying with instructions and sticking by the rules of the preschool. When tasks became challenging he tended to get frustrated and upset, and gave up early. He seemed to need a lot of guidance from the teacher to stay on task. Jungkook had a couple of little friends in the preschool, but she observed Jungkook get into several arguments with his friends, and actually shove another child (not one of his friends) in order to get a toy. She recommended that you try to be extra affectionate with Jungkook and provide a lot of praise at home for positive behavior. At the same time, you should communicate the rules clearly and use a set of graded consequences (e.g., first a warning, then a time out, then removal of privileges) if Jungkook does not follow the rules.
He scored about average in language comprehension and production. For example, when asked to tell a story about a funny picture, he was able to give the broad outlines as well as a few interesting details. Your friend recommended having more conversations with Jungkook about anything of interest, reading aloud, watching educational television together and going to places of interest to him.
Jungkook was in the average range in terms of understanding quantitative relationships (e.g., “more/less”, “longer/shorter”), in counting skills, in classifying objects (e.g., types of animals) and in solving age-appropriate reasoning tasks. Your friend recommended that you work on these skills indirectly (e.g., encourage counting as a part of games or other activities Jungkook enjoys), rather than trying to teach them directly.
He performed about average in copying designs, solving picture puzzles, and building block towers to match one made by the examiner. Your friend encouraged you to promote any of these activities that Jungkook enjoys.
Jungkook’s gross motor skills are above average, for example, climbing, riding on trikes, kicking balls and playing catch. Your friend encourages you to follow Jungkook’s interests in these physical areas.
You filled out a parenting questionnaire. The developmental specialist reported that your scores indicate you are about average in warmth and affection displayed toward Jungkook.
The parenting questionnaire scores indicate you are currently more disciplined than average with Jungkook.

– Kindergarten screening –
Jungkook will turn 5 this summer and will be a bit on the young side in the fall when he starts kindergarten. The school where Jungkook will attend kindergarten has started a kindergarten prep session over the summer that lasts for a couple of weeks and involves group as well as individual work on letters, numbers, etc. You enroll Jungkook at the age of 4 years, 10 months. He is assessed by one of the kindergarten teachers, who observes him during free play and tests Jungkook one-on-one. Then the teacher sits down with you and your partner and gives the following report:
The teacher noted that Jungkook seemed to have made one or two friends and usually played cooperatively with them. She observed that Jungkook was sometimes reluctant to join in new activities with unfamiliar children.
He could read a few short words and write his name and could name most of the letters on sight at the time of testing. He also showed an age-appropriate understanding of phonological awareness (e.g., deciding whether two words started with the same sound, picking out the two words that rhymed from a list of three words). The teacher recommended continuing to enjoy reading and writing activities – Jungkook was well-prepared for literacy activities in kindergarten.
The teacher noted that Jungkook had some difficulty adapting to the “practice” kindergarten activities the children were asked to do. Jungkook was generally trying to do a good job, but sometimes became uncooperative or rebellious with the teachers, sometimes got distracted and went off task, and sometimes became upset when mild stress occurred (such as an instruction to hurry up). The teacher recommended that Jungkook get more experience with structured activities at home and at preschool and that he be given reminders and praise for good behavior.
He performed in the average range on tests of vocabulary e.g., naming a picture and providing an antonym or synonym for a word), and the ability to retell a story. The teacher thought you should engage in more reading aloud, and encourage Jungkook to tell stories, perhaps so that you could write them down and read them back to him.
Jungkook has age-appropriate skills in counting, classifying and understanding quantitative relationships. Nothing special needs to be done in this area, as the kindergarten class picks up and teaches these skills very effectively, says the teacher.
Jungkook was fairly interested in the little art projects the teachers had the students do, and seemed to enjoy the pre-math activities involving working with blocks and geometric shapes.
The teacher reports that your scores on the parenting questionnaire put you slightly above average in terms of affection and warmth displayed toward your child.
The parenting questionnaire scores put you in the top 15% in terms of control and discipline exercised with your child.

– Individual Differences in Cognitive Abilities –
There are a variety of approaches to the study of individual differences in cognitive ability. Three areas that are commonly assessed by current cognitive abilities tests are verbal ability, spatial ability, and logical-mathematical ability. Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligences approach added additional domains of intelligence based on developmental and neuropsychological evidence: musical ability, physical/athletic ability, intrapersonal skill (understanding of the self and others, theory of mind), interpersonal skill (social competence, perspective taking), and more recently, naturalistic intelligence (understanding of the natural world). In the program, levels of verbal, spatial, logico-mathematical, musical and bodily-kinesthetic ability are influenced by your questionnaire responses. These abilities can be changed slowly by a large number of environmental factors.
The behavior of the child at any given point is consistent with the child’s developmental level. For example, a child with high musical ability in middle childhood will be enthusiastic and talented in the school instrumental program, a child with average musical ability will take up an instrument, learn something about music, but not become accomplished at it, and a child with low musical ability will be uninterested in playing an instrument and unable to carry a tune. Another example is that children who are low in verbal ability go through the language milestones (such as speaking in grammatical sentences) at a slower rate, and have lower interest in reading and lower reading comprehension later in childhood, than children of average or above average ability.
The student parent has choices whether to push the child in each ability domain, and in some cases this can result in steady progress. Intrapersonal and interpersonal intelligence are captured by underlying variables in the program such as attachment security, emotionality, peer competence, self control, and the three personality types. These aspects of the child are also influenced somewhat by your questionnaire responses, and can change in response to cumulative effects of social experiences and parenting choices.

– First Grade Report card –
Some highlights of the first grade report card were the following ratings:
Usually works cooperatively in groups, usually respects rights and property of others, and usually demonstrates appropriate peer social interaction.
“Demonstrates strength” in reading and writing.
In the comments section the teacher wrote: Jungkook occasionally gets upset in stressful situations but usually calms down fairly quickly.
“Demonstrates strength” in the areas of speaking and listening and in content knowledge of social studies and science.
“Developmentally appropriate” in the areas of mathematical problem solving, understanding of data and number concepts.
“Developmentally appropriate” in the areas of spatial understanding and visual arts.
Jungkook was usually appropriately active during recess and physical games, and appropriately quiet during periods of work in the classroom setting. He did not show an unusual amount of impulsive or distractible behavior.
Consistently works independently, consistently listens attentively and follows directions, and consistently follows classroom rules.

– Psychologist’s report-age 8 –
Psychologist’s report at age 8:
His scores were in the average to above average range in word reading, reading fluency, phonological awareness and spelling.
He was quiet and reserved with the examiner. He seemed a little nervous during the testing, particularly on the harder items, but remained cooperative and hard-working throughout the IQ and achievement testing.
These were some of Jungkook’s scores on the Verbal portion of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (where 7 is one standard deviation below the mean, 10 is the mean and 13 is one standard deviation above the mean): Information (11), Vocabulary (12), Similarities (11), Comprehension (13).
Jungkook’s scores on the math concepts, math application problems, and math computation tests were in the average range.
Jungkook’s scores on tests of visual-spatial ability (spatial rotation, copying of designs, etc.) were above average.
The psychologist gave you and the teacher a questionnaire on behavioral and attentional problems, and reported that Jungkook did not have unusual problems with impulsivity, inattentiveness or hyperactivity. He was very focused and maintained concentration throughout the IQ and achievement testing.
The psychologist interviews you using a standard set of questions about parenting attitudes. According to your scores, you are about average in warmth and affection toward your child.
Your scores on the parenting questionnaire indicates you are in the top 15% in discipline and control toward your child.

-5th grade report card-
Some highlights of the 5th grade report card (the one that is being sent on to middle school with Jungkook’s portfolio of writing samples, and standardized test scores) were as follows:
Consistently works cooperatively in groups, consistently respects rights and property of others, and consistently demonstrates appropriate peer social interaction.
“Demonstrates strength” in all areas of reading, and in spelling and “appropriate for grade level” in writing.
In the comments section the teacher wrote: Sometimes Jungkook gets upset in stressful situations inside or outside the classroom, and will withdraw from activities or become anxious or moody. He usually improves before the day is over.
“Demonstrates strength” in the areas of speaking and listening and in content knowledge of social studies and science.
“Appropriate for grade level” in the areas of mathematical problem solving, understanding of data, number concepts, graphical applications, and arithmetic computation.
“Demonstrates strength” in the area of art.
“Appropriate for grade level” in the area of music.
Consistently works independently, listens attentively, and follows directions and classroom rules.

– 7th grade report card –
You got Jungkook’s 7th grade report card early in the summer. Some highlights of the report card:
Jungkook consistently contributes to cooperative group activities and respects the rights and possessions of others, has consistently appropriate social interaction with peers, and even seems to be a kind of peer leader.
His word reading, spelling and writing skills are strong.
He got A’s in 7th grade English, Social Studies, and Spanish.
He got a B in both 7th grade Math and 7th grade Science.
Jungkook took art in 7th grade as an option, and got an A.
Jungkook took 7th grade chorus as an elective and got an A.
He listens attentively, follows directions, and follows school rules.
He is quite effective at time management, and highly consistent in working independently in the classroom and on homework. He has almost no problems completing assignments and turning them in on time.

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